Tough All Over
Epic Records
Produced By Bob Montgomery
Released 1990

bob montgomery
Bob Montgomery May 12, 1937 - Dec 4, 2014

CBS was CBS before it was Sony. CBS records sat on the corner of 16th Avenue in Nashville. I walked into that building a lot and it felt like a good place, a creative place and I was proud to be a part of it. Billy Sherrill used to run it in the days of Tammy and Tanya. He had a big office and there was a studio in it where he made the tender loving country gold records we love and still listen to.

Those days were long gone and Billy had long been gone from that building. Nashville was a changing city. I could feel a change and I started to understand what the music business was all about as an artist. I didn’t even realize I was an artist yet. I knew I was a singer and I knew I wanted to have hit records and tour, and be a part of the recording world.

But something changed and I started to see that it didn’t matter how good you were as a singer, it only mattered if what you cut on a record got airplay from radio stations around the country and there was a political part to having that happen. So when it came time for me to record my second record for CBS, I felt I was being controlled by the label and those involved in the making of my record. They convinced me to use the great Bob Montgomery as a producer, and I was loyal to Billy Sherrill, already was feeling like the decisions were no longer mine. But the hardest part was when I began looking for songs to record, I was being served certain songs to listen to with little or no say in the end decision. I knew instantly I didn’t like being told what to sing or how to sing it, so the cloud above me was becoming a looming gray and I could feel the depression setting in.

They would say “But this is a hit record. This song will get you on the radio.”
And my reply was, “But it’s crap. I don’t like it.”
The process was becoming more and more uninspiring. Any ideas I had on my own even though I was so young and unknowing would not be mine. Tough All Over is an album full of songs I did not choose to sing, all geared to getting country radio airplay.

The title track was released and made it to number 13 on the Country charts and I was nominated for an Academy Of Country Music Best New Artist award. But I was so unhappy and out of control I could not embrace it, turned on the system, snubbed the label and started retreating into a place where I would soon find myself alone in a fight I could never win. I won the ACM award and the label was excited and assumed that this would be good for all of us, but I rejected the game, didn’t want to play it, started to become obstinate and uncooperative, which in turn caused the label to lose faith in me. The new day dawned and the excitement left with it. I was on my own from that time forward, a respected outcast that everyone had hoped the very best for, was pulling for, but had no time for.

The tug o’ war I insisted on began. I wasn’t a political fit. I just wanted to make good records that would last a lifetime. I didn’t know what I was getting into with all of these people and radio stations and sucking up to people who didn’t know how to make an E chord.
Without knowing it, I was designing a different destiny for myself.

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Tough All Over
Epic Records
Produced By Bob Montgomery
Released 1990

bob montgomery
Bob Montgomery May 12, 1937 - Dec 4, 2014

CBS was CBS before it was Sony. CBS records sat on the corner of 16th Avenue in Nashville. I walked into that building a lot and it felt like a good place, a creative place and I was proud to be a part of it. Billy Sherrill used to run it in the days of Tammy and Tanya. He had a big office and there was a studio in it where he made the tender loving country gold records we love and still listen to.

Those days were long gone and Billy had long been gone from that building. Nashville was a changing city. I could feel a change and I started to understand what the music business was all about as an artist. I didn’t even realize I was an artist yet. I knew I was a singer and I knew I wanted to have hit records and tour, and be a part of the recording world.

But something changed and I started to see that it didn’t matter how good you were as a singer, it only mattered if what you cut on a record got airplay from radio stations around the country and there was a political part to having that happen. So when it came time for me to record my second record for CBS, I felt I was being controlled by the label and those involved in the making of my record. They convinced me to use the great Bob Montgomery as a producer, and I was loyal to Billy Sherrill, already was feeling like the decisions were no longer mine. But the hardest part was when I began looking for songs to record, I was being served certain songs to listen to with little or no say in the end decision. I knew instantly I didn’t like being told what to sing or how to sing it, so the cloud above me was becoming a looming gray and I could feel the depression setting in.

They would say “But this is a hit record. This song will get you on the radio.”
And my reply was, “But it’s crap. I don’t like it.”
The process was becoming more and more uninspiring. Any ideas I had on my own even though I was so young and unknowing would not be mine. Tough All Over is an album full of songs I did not choose to sing, all geared to getting country radio airplay.

The title track was released and made it to number 13 on the Country charts and I was nominated for an Academy Of Country Music Best New Artist award. But I was so unhappy and out of control I could not embrace it, turned on the system, snubbed the label and started retreating into a place where I would soon find myself alone in a fight I could never win. I won the ACM award and the label was excited and assumed that this would be good for all of us, but I rejected the game, didn’t want to play it, started to become obstinate and uncooperative, which in turn caused the label to lose faith in me. The new day dawned and the excitement left with it. I was on my own from that time forward, a respected outcast that everyone had hoped the very best for, was pulling for, but had no time for.

The tug o’ war I insisted on began. I wasn’t a political fit. I just wanted to make good records that would last a lifetime. I didn’t know what I was getting into with all of these people and radio stations and sucking up to people who didn’t know how to make an E chord.
Without knowing it, I was designing a different destiny for myself.

PRODUCT UNAVAILABLE

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